• Business Deductions

  • Education and Child Tax Benefits

  • Energy Incentives

  • Investment Planning

  • Health Care Planning​

  • Alternative Minimum Tax



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  • Gift Giving​

  • IRA, Retirement Savings Rules for 2016

  • Deferring Income to 2017

  • Accelerating Expense to 2016

  • Deduction Planning

  • Individual Deductions​


For more information on these strategies, click here.

  • Deferring Income into 2017

  • Accelerating Income into 2017

  • Business Deductions​

  • Business Credits

For more information on these strategies, click here.


2016 Year-End Tax Planning for Businesses


As 2016 draws to a close, there is still time to reduce your 2016 tax bill and plan ahead for 2017. Below are several potential tax-saving opportunities for owners of businesses operating as S corporations or limited liability companies to consider. I will arrange to meet with you to discuss specific strategies and issues that you have in mind.

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  • Medical Payment Exclusion

  • Gifts in Trust

  • Charitable Gifts​

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Tax Planning


President- Elect Donald Trump's Position on Taxes

(As of November 15, 2016)


For more information, click here.


2016 Gift Tax Planning Ideas


Here are useful yearend tax planning from an estate and gift tax perspective. Below are various strategies for gifts to children and grandchildren during 2016, while incurring little or no gift tax. Also, many of these techniques could reduce your overall income tax burden.  

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For more information on these strategies, click here.


2016 Year-End Tax Planning for Individuals


As 2016 draws to a close, there is still time to reduce your 2016 tax bill and plan ahead for 2017. Below are several potential tax-saving opportunities for you to consider. I would be happy to meet with you to discuss specific strategies.


As a general reminder, there are several ways in which you can file an income tax return: married filing jointly, head of household, single, and married filing separately. A married couple, which includes legally recognized same-sex marriages, may elect to file one return reporting their combined income, computing the tax liability using the tax tables or rate schedules for “Married Persons Filing Jointly.” If a married couple files separate returns, under certain situations they can amend and file jointly, but they cannot amend a jointly filed return and file separately. A joint return may be filed even though one spouse has neither gross income nor deductions. If one spouse dies during the year, the surviving spouse may file a joint return for the year in which his or her spouse died. Certain married persons who do not elect to file a joint return may be entitled to use the lower head of household tax rates. Generally, in order to qualify as a head of household, you must not be a resident alien, you must satisfy certain marital status requirements, and you must maintain a household for a qualifying child or any other person who is your dependent, if you are entitled to a dependency deduction for the taxable year for such person.

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  • Inventories​

  • Health Care Planning​

  • Reporting​

  • Electronic Deposits​

  • Use of Applicable Exclusion Amount to Reduce Estate and Gift Tax

  • ​Annual Gift Tax Exclusion

  • Tuition Payment Exclusion

  • Section 529 College Savings Plans

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